Interview with Scots historical fiction author Marie Macpherson


Anniversary giveaway

My blog is two years’ old this month (time flies) and to celebrate, I’m giving away a copy of Marie Macpherson’s novel “The First Blast of the Trumpet.”  

Leave a comment  on what interests you about Scottish history or a question for the author on this post by Saturday, August 24, 2013 at 8:00 p.m. US Central time to be entered into a drawing to win this book.  One person will be chosen randomly using Random.org. Please make sure to leave an e-mail address with your comment.  (US, Canada and UK entrants only.) 

THE GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANKS TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED.    

About Marie Macpherson: Born in the historic town of Musselburgh, Scotland, Marie left the Honest Toun to study for an Honours Degree in Russian language and literature. She then went on to gain a PhD, spending a year in the former Soviet Union to carry out research on the 19th century Russian writer, Lermontov, said to be descended from the Scottish bard and seer, Thomas the Rhymer. Though she travelled widely throughout Europe, teaching languages and literature from Madrid to Moscow, she has never lost her passion for the culture and history of her homeland of Scotland. Now retired from academic life, she has more time to pursue her interest in creative writing. She won the Martha Hamilton Prize for Creative Writing from Edinburgh University and was named ‘Tyne & Esk Writer of the Year’ in 2011.

About Marie Macpherson: Born in the historic town of Musselburgh, Scotland, Marie left the Honest Toun to study for an Honours Degree in Russian language and literature. She then went on to gain a PhD, spending a year in the former Soviet Union to carry out research on the 19th century Russian writer, Lermontov, said to be descended from the Scottish bard and seer, Thomas the Rhymer.
Though she travelled widely throughout Europe, teaching languages and literature from Madrid to Moscow, she has never lost her passion for the culture and history of her homeland of Scotland.
Now retired from academic life, she has more time to pursue her interest in creative writing. She won the Martha Hamilton Prize for Creative Writing from Edinburgh University and was named ‘Tyne & Esk Writer of the Year’ in 2011.

Interview with Marie Macpherson

Marie Macpherson is the author of “The First Blast of the Trumpet,” her first novel and the first in a trilogy about Scottish Reformation preacher John Knox.  Her novel, reviewed here, is a refreshing take on Knox, an individual somewhat vilified by popular history.   She shared with me how John Knox chose her, what her researched revealed that surprised her and some of the best and worst advice she received while writing the book.

(If you aren’t familiar with John Knox, Marie narrates a wonderful documentary on YouTube, where you will also find a quick video synopsis of the novel.)

Q.  What inspired you to write “The First Blast of the Trumpet?”

A.  The louring figure of John Knox has cast a long shadow over Scottish history and culture, but I never thought I’d be inspired to write about him. The founding father of the Scottish Reformation is not exactly the obvious choice for the hero of a novel and so I’ve the spooky feeling he chose me. With his 500th birthday looming perhaps he needed someone to sound the fanfare. For I was doing research on the Treaty of Haddington (which betrothed Mary Queen of Scots to the Dauphin in 1548), when I became side-tracked by Haddington’s most famous son, who was then a galley slave and perhaps even rowed her to France. What a coincidence, I thought, and became curious to know how Knox had ended up imprisoned in the galleys. And what I found out could only be written as fiction. 

The First Blast of the Trumpet, the first of a trilogy, is a fictional account of the early, undocumented life of the Scottish Reformer, John Knox. Beginning just before Flodden in 1511 it ends in 1548 after the signing of the Treaty of Haddington that sends Mary Queen of Scots to France in a galley being rowed (possibly) by her nemesis, Knox.

The First Blast of the Trumpet, the first of a trilogy, is a fictional account of the early, undocumented life of the Scottish Reformer, John Knox. Beginning just before Flodden in 1511 it ends in 1548 after the signing of the Treaty of Haddington that sends Mary Queen of Scots to France in a galley being rowed (possibly) by her nemesis, Knox.

Q. History has not been terribly kind to John Knox, was it hard to develop his character and get beyond bias?

A.  It depends on how you regard him – superman or bogeyman. For some Knox is the champion who brought the Reformation to Scotland but in the popular imagination he’s become a caricature of himself: a cartoon Calvinist, a pulpit-thumping tyrant who hated women and banned not only Christmas but football on Sundays. Whatever his legacy, Knox will always be remembered as the author of that misogynist rant, The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women, which attacked contemporary female rulers: Marie de Guise in Scotland, Mary I in England and Mary Queen of Scots in France. Yet Knox was only voicing what most men of the time believed – that it was ‘monstrous’ or ‘unnatural’ for a woman to wear the pants never the mind the crown – though rather loudly and more vehemently.

So you can imagine my surprise to find out that Knox had a genuine regard for women – an affection that was mutual. Women loved him – not the three Marys, of course – but Knox was married twice and other men’s wives left their husbands to follow him. Did he, as one chronicler, claim… use the black arts to steal men’s wives from under their noses? All this made me reconsider the character and reputation of the Calvinist Reformer. No doubt as a preacher he had great charisma and his correspondence with women – especially his mother-in-law – reveals great patience, respect and even understanding. I even think other men were jealous as one said, ‘Whenever he makes a journey he takes around with him a certain number of women whom he uses to satisfy his lusts.’ Can you imagine! This is John Knox we’re talking about!

But why was this? It struck me that there might have been a strong female influence in his upbringing. Not his mother, for she died when he was very young, so who then?

English: The statue of the Scottish church ref...

Statue of John Knox in the quadrangle of New College, Edinburgh. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A. I can’t say that Knox was my favourite character but he certainly provides an interesting psychological case study. You can probably tell that his godmother, Elisabeth Hepburn, the real-life Prioress of St Mary’s Abbey is my favourite. While searching for clues as to who might have influenced the young Knox I was excited to come across this feisty dame, forced into the wealthy convent to protect the Hepburn family interests. Prioress Elisabeth was the aunt of Patrick, 3rd Earl of Bothwell and great-aunt to his son, James the 4th Earl, who married Mary Queen of Scots.

Patrick, the Fair Earl as he was known, is a rather despicable character. He was a real traitor – in the pay of the English for most of his life and forever changing sides depending on the highest bidder. He even divorced his wife to woo the widow queen, Marie de Guise who – clever lady that she was – kept him dangling. His treachery, I’m sure, explains his son’s decision to remain true to the Hepburn motto: Keep Tryst, which means keep trust or faith. Whatever his faults, James Hepburn was loyal to Mary Queen of Scots.

Q. How long did it take you to research the novel? 

A.  It’s difficult to say exactly how long it took to research. For many years it was a labour of love – delving in the archives of the local library, unearthing scraps of information and putting together the pieces, like a giant jigsaw – until I had enough to create a story with a dark secret at the centre!

Q.  Did your research yield any surprises in terms of historical events or illuminate a character in a particular way?  

A.  I was surprised to find out how little was known about Knox’s early life and that most of the so-called facts had all been disputed. Since historians and biographers couldn’t answer satisfactorily questions that bothered me such as: Who were his parents? How did a poor orphan lad get an expensive education? – I didn’t feel so guilty about creating a fictional life for him.

Another surprise was discovering that Sir David Lindsay played a very important part in persuading Knox to become a Protestant preacher.  But the role of the playwright of Ane Satire of the Three Estates – a scathing attack on the Roman Catholic Church – is generally overlooked.

Q.  How long did it take you to write it (first draft)?  

A.  The first draft took me ages to write, gathering information and then discarding it. I lost count of the number of rewrites. All in all, it probably took five years.

Q.  What part of the novel writing process was most difficult?  Easiest? 

A.  The most difficult part was finding my novelist’s voice. That was a struggle. Coming from an academic background, I was more inclined to preach and teach and so had to drag myself away from ‘telling’ and learn to do lots more ‘showing’. But writing fiction has given me a tremendous freedom – to speculate about facts, make leaps of the imagination and, more importantly, create an inner life for my characters.

Q.  Where did you unearth all those terrific Scots phrases, some of which are not used too often these days?  

A.  Though many may struggle with the dialect I would defend my use of Scots. Especially after one of the publisher’s readers advised ditching the dialect as it might put readers off, so I did. But then, after I’d rewritten the whole novel in Standard English, it was returned with the instruction: ‘Put all the Scots words back in! It’s lost it’s magic, it’s lost its authenticity, its uniqueness.’ In other words, I had lost my voice!

I deliberately don’t use colloquialisms such as cannae, dinnae etc., but try to pepper the narrative with Scots words and phrases to give it a strong flavour. I would also advise readers to relax and go with the flow – it’s not essential to understand the exact meaning of every word – but I hope the sense can be grasped within the context.

For authentic vocabulary I sifted through Scottish literature of the 16th century (which I love) including David Lindsay’s play Ane Satire of the Three Estates, the poetry of the makars; William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas and Robert Henryson. And tales and ballads were a great resource, too.

Q.  How did you plan your outline — or did it evolve organically?  Did you use any of the writing tools, software out there?  

A.  I read as widely as possible for the historical background and because I can’t read my own handwriting I type out all the information I’ve gleaned.  Then I sift through my notes, looking out for pivotal points, inciting scenes, hinges of the narrative: life-changing events when decisions have to be made, challenges met, characters fall in love or fall out. Anything that will provide drama and conflict.

I try to visualise these pivotal points in a scene, like a film, and draft it like a screenplay, with each scene forming the basis of a chapter. To keep me on track, I have to give a title to each chapter e.g. Birth, Flodden, The Miracle. Then I fill in the gaps with dialogue, description, details.

I don’t have any fancy writing tools or software – just Word. I did investigate one or two but in the time it would take me to learn how to work it I could have written the novel.

Q.  If you had one piece of advice for new historical fiction writers with work in progress what would it be?

A.  Write every day. The brain is like a muscle and gets flabby if not exercised – even if it’s only half-an-hour. It’s amazing what can get done in that time.

Q.  What is the best and worst advice you got while writing?

A.  Stay true to yourself and don’t be waylaid by the naysayers.  Worst piece of advice – for me at any rate – was: Ditch the dialect!  But there won’t be as much Scots in the next volume as Knox spent most his time in England and Geneva and had to learn to speak like a southerner!

Q. When is the next book in the trilogy due to be released?

A.  The working title of the next book is ‘The Second Blast of the Trumpet’ and is planned for released in 2015.  It  will cover Knox’s life in exile from 1549 to 1559 when he returns to Scotland.

Some other posts on John Knox you might find interesting 

44 comments on “Interview with Scots historical fiction author Marie Macpherson

  1. mariegm1210 says:

    Many thanks to everyone who took part in this Giveaway.
    Congratulations to the winner!
    So sorry you couldn’t all win but by way of consolation you can download a free copy of my short story, The Corbie Messenger’ – a prequel to The First Blast of the Trumpet – from Knox Robinson Publishing Website.

    You can also watch the mini-documentary in which I give a brief outline of the historical facts. Shot in Scotland it features many of the locations mentioned in the novel.

    Oh and there’s a trailer for the novel too!!
    Enjoy!

  2. mariegm1210 says:

    You and thousands of others! It’s his First Blast against the Monstrous Regiment of Women that has raised our hackles – mine included – and that’s why I had to find out more about the bogeyman.

  3. I can’t wait to get this. There seems to be so little about John Knox I’m sure I will find it fascinating!

    • mariegm1210 says:

      Thanks for your comment – it’s true there’s hardly anything about Knox other than hagiographies which is surprising when you think about the impact he’s had on the Scottish psyche & culture. Even his 500th anniversary has been ignored. Perhaps my novel will sound a fanfare!

  4. […] Giveaway and Interview with Scots historical fiction author Marie Macpherson. […]

  5. A H Gray says:

    I had never heard of John Knox before now but he sounds like he lived an extraordinary life. Already through this interview he sounds like a very complex character. Can’t wait to have a read!

    • mariegm1210 says:

      Thanks for that! While Knox’s early life is shrouded in mystery, his later life reads more like an adventure thriller than a history. Hope to capture that excitement in my novels.

  6. Gil Harris says:

    I like to read good books and this looks good to me.

  7. Ali Bacon says:

    Interesting post – especially re the dialect. In my Scottish (contemporary) novel I decided to use Scots words and expressions sparingly, partly because I now live south of the border and my ear – and voice? are less in tune . Most people have liked the ones I used, but a few transatlantic readers were bamboozled!
    John Knox is a fascinating subject – I’m afraid I know only the stereotype. Ali B

    • mariegm1210 says:

      Using dialect is always a dilemma, Ali. Yet it didn’t stop Irvine Welsh’s ‘Trainspotting’ from going global! Strangely enough transatlantic readers have been less fazed. I think that Scottish readers think they should know all the words!

  8. Danny Kuhn says:

    I love historical fiction, and the more historically accurate, the better. We forget how those distant events influenced the lives we live today. I’m looking forward to The First Blast of the Trumpet!

    • mariegm1210 says:

      Thanks for taking part, Danny. I think writers shy away from tackling Knox because of his reputation as a religious fundamentalist but for me, that makes it all the more important to find out what drove the man.

  9. I know little about Scottish history, except for the books about Mary Queen of Scots, that I have read. This is a shame since an Irish cousin thinks we are descended from James III. John Knox seems like a very interesting personality.Imagine banning Christmas and football! What an uproar he would cause, if he did that today!Thank you for the giveaway.
    denannduvall@gmail.com

  10. Gil Harris says:

    I don’t know much about Scottish history, if I win and read the book, I may learn a lot. Ilene Harris

  11. Ruth says:

    This looks great – to be honest I know it’s great because I’ve already read it. It really brings history alive…and is relevant to today. So looking forward to parts 2 + 3

  12. brenda haven says:

    I love Scottish history and all novels written based in Scotland. I don’t really know much about John Knox or his place in history but would love to learn more about him. It would be interesting to read a novel about him.

  13. Debra Brown says:

    I was impressed with the students who stole back the Stone of Scone. Way ta go!

    kescah at comcast dot net

  14. I am fascinated by Scottish history – and in particular the far-reaching consequences of the Scottish Reformation. There is a personal reason for this; my husband’s family fled Scotland in the 17th century due to religious persecution. Would love to read this book – all the way to its dark, secret center! anna.belfrage@telia.com

    • mariegm1210 says:

      That’s very interesting, Anna. Did they flee during the Killing Times? It’s surprising that so little has been written about the Reformation in Scotland and the founding father, John Knox. Perhaps because he’s seen as the root of sectarianism in modern day Scotland. which might explain some of the reactions I get when I say I’ve written a novel about him!

  15. Hilda Reilly says:

    I’m intrigued to learn that Knox spent time as a galley slave. Now this is something I didn’t learn in my Scottish school. Interesting to see that he banned football on Sunday. Pity he hadn’t gone a little further and banned it altogether!

    • mariegm1210 says:

      OOh heresy, heresy Hilda! Nae fitba! Now that wold cause a revolution. Knox spent about 19 months in the galleys & lived to tell the tale. Perhaps that made him even more determined to plough on with his reformist ideas! He’s a very interesting psychological case.

  16. Sandra Furlotte says:

    It is wonderful to see a book that deals with something other than battles in Scottish history.

    • mariegm1210 says:

      …. and is not slash and bash with a claymore wielding bare-torsoed highlander for a hero, Sandra. What interests me is the impact that battles have on people’s lives rather than how they’re fought.

  17. Gil Harris says:

    Hope I win, looks good.

  18. Ashley York says:

    What a wonderful topic! Knox just seems like an amazing person to me. I love that he had a “genuine regard for women” despite his misogynist reputation. He really has been slammed by historians. Good to know he has redeeming qualities besides his influence on the educational system in Scotland. Looking forward to reading your book.

    • mariegm1210 says:

      Thanks for that Ashley. Knox is a very complex character and it’s a pity that he’s been reduced to cartoon dimensions. And the world he lived in was not ready for his radical ideas to do with social equality and democracy.

  19. This period is a little before the one I write in, but many of the events in Knox’s lifetime impact on my period, I’m looking forward to the next instalment in the trilogy. margaretskea@hotmail.com

    • mariegm1210 says:

      The Reformation certainly had an enormous impact on Scottish society, Margaret. We may not have had a Renaissance, but breaking the stranglehold of Rome probably led the way to the Scottish Enlightenment. Now moving on to Knox in exile!

  20. Sue Coelman says:

    I, too, am interested in Scottish history as I have heritage from there as well as England and Ireland. I would love to read this book.

    • mariegm1210 says:

      And I hope you will, Sue. I’ve had to teach myself about Scottish history because we got taught so little at school – at primary it was mostly myths and legends – Bruce & the spider, Braveheart etc – while at secondary it was ‘British’ history based on Acts of Parliament – and for me – dull as ditchwater.

  21. whatmeread says:

    I haven’t read much fiction about Scottish history, but what I have read has been very good, especially Dorothy Dunnett. I am curious to read this book about John Knox.

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